Aug 10, 2018 Installing R. Go to this website. If your mac is OS X 10.11 and higher (this should be the case for most of you), click the R-3.5.1.pkg link. If your mac is OS X 10.9 or 10.10, click the R-3.3.3.pkg link. After clicking on the link, the file (package installer) will be downloaded onto your computer. Go to CRAN and click on Download R for (Mac) OS X. Select the.pkg file for the version of OS X that you have and the file will download. Double click on the file that was downloaded and R will install. Go to the RStudio Download page. Under Installers select RStudio current version ## - Mac OS X 10.6+ (64-bit) to download it.

R is a computer language. It’s a tool for doing the computation and number-crunching that set the stage for statistical analysis and decision-making. RStudio is an open source integrated development environment (IDE) for creating and running R code. It’s available in versions for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Although you don’t need an IDE in order to work with R, RStudio makes life a lot easier.

Download R from the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). In your browser, type this address if you work in Windows:

cran.r-project.org/bin/windows/base/

Type this one if you work on the Mac:

cran.r-project.org/bin/macosx/

Click the link to download R. This puts the win.exe file in your Windows computer, or the .pkg file in your Mac. In either case, follow the usual installation procedures. When installation is complete, Windows users see an R icon on their desktop, Mac users see it in their Application folder.

Both URLs provides helpful links to FAQs. The Windows-related URL also links to “Installation and other instructions.”

Now for RStudio.

Click the link for the installer for your computer, and again follow the usual installation procedures.

After the RStudio installation is finished, click the RStudio icon to open the window shown.

If you already have an older version of RStudio and you go through this installation procedure, the install updates to the latest version (and you don’t have to uninstall the older version).

The large Console pane on the left runs R code. One way to run R code is to type it directly into the Console pane.

The other two panes provide helpful information as you work with R. The Environment and History pane is in the upper right. The Environment tab keeps track of the things you create (which R calls objects) as you work with R. The History tab tracks R code that you enter.

Get used to the word object. Everything in R is an object.

The Files, Plots, Packages, and Help tabs are in the pane in the lower right. The Files tab shows files you create. The Plots tab holds graphs you create from your data. The Packages tab shows add-ons (called packages) you downloaded as part of the R installation. Bear in mind that “downloaded” doesn’t mean “ready to use.” To use a package’s capabilities, one more step is necessary, and you’ll want to use packages.

This figure shows the Packages tab. The packages are in either the user library (which you can see in the figure) or the system library (which you have to scroll down to).

The Help tab, shown here, provides links to a wealth of information about R and RStudio.

To tap into the full power of RStudio as an IDE, click the larger of the two icons in the upper right corner of the Console pane. That changes the appearance of RStudio so that it looks like this:

R For Mac

The top of the Console pane relocates to the lower left. The new pane in the upper left is the Scripts pane. You type and edit code in the Scripts pane and press Ctrl+R (Command+Enter on the Mac), and then the code executes in the Console pane.

Download R And Rstudio Mac Os

Ctrl+Enter works just like Ctrl+R. You can also select Code → Run Selected Line(s).

R is an incredibly powerful open source program for statistics and graphics. It can run on pretty much any computer and has a very active and friendly support community online. Graphics created by R are extremely extensible and are used in high level publications like the New York Times (as explained by this former NYT infographic designer).

RStudio is an integrated development environment (IDE) for R. It’s basically a nice front-end for R, giving you a console, a scripting window, a graphics window, and an R workspace, among other options.

R Commander is a basic graphical user interface (GUI) for R. It provides a series of menus that allow you to run lots of statistic tests and create graphics without typing a line of code. More advanced features of R aren’t accessible through R Commander, but you can use it for the majority of your statistics. (Lots of people (like me) use R Commander as a crutch for a few months before they get the hang of the R language. As intimidating as it might be to constantly type stuff at the console, it really is a lot faster.)

Download R And Rstudio Mac

R Studio Mac Os

However, as is the case with lots of free and open source software, it can be a little tricky to install all of these different programs and get them to work nicely together. The simple instructions below explain how to get everything working right.

Install R, RStudio, and R Commander in Windows

  1. Download R from http://cran.us.r-project.org/ (click on “Download R for Windows” > “base” > “Download R 2.x.x for Windows”)
  2. Install R. Leave all default settings in the installation options.
  3. Download RStudio from http://rstudio.org/download/desktop and install it. Leave all default settings in the installation options.
  4. Open RStudio.
  5. Go to the “Packages” tab and click on “Install Packages”. The first time you’ll do this you’ll be prompted to choose a CRAN mirror. R will download all necessary files from the server you select here. Choose the location closest to you (probably “USA CA 1” or “USA CA 2”, which are housed at UC Berkeley and UCLA, respectively).
  6. Start typing “Rcmdr” until you see it appear in a list. Select the first option (or finish typing Rcmdr), ensure that “Install dependencies” is checked, and click “Install”.
  7. Wait while all the parts of the R Commander package are installed.
  8. If you get permission errors while installing packages, close R Studio and reopen it with administrator privileges.

Install R, RStudio, and R Commander in Mac OS X

  1. Download R from http://cran.us.r-project.org/ (click on “Download R for Mac OS X” > “R-2.x.x.pkg (latest version)”)
  2. Install R.
  3. Download RStudio from http://rstudio.org/download/desktop.
  4. Install RStudio by dragging the application icon to your Applications folder.
  5. Download Tcl/Tk from http://cran.r-project.org/bin/macosx/tools/ (click on tcltk-8.x.x-x11.dmg; OS X needs this to run R Commander.)
  6. Install Tcl/Tk.
  7. Go to your Applications folder and find a folder named Utilities. Verify that you have a program named “X11” there. If not, go to http://xquartz.macosforge.org/ and download and install the latest version of XQuartz.
  8. Open RStudio.
  9. Go to the “Packages” tab and click on “Install Packages”. The first time you’ll do this you’ll be prompted to choose a CRAN mirror. R will download all necessary files from the server you select here. Choose the location closest to you (probably “USA CA 1” or “USA CA 2”, which are housed at UC Berkeley and UCLA, respectively).
  10. Start typing “Rcmdr” until you see it appear in a list. Select the first option (or finish typing Rcmdr), ensure that “Install dependencies” is checked, and click “Install”.
  11. Wait while all the parts of the R Commander package are installed.

Open R Commander in Windows and OS X

Once you’ve installed R Commander, you won’t have to go through all those steps again! Running R Commander from this point on is simple—follow the instructions below.

If you decide to stop using R Commander and just stick with R, all you ever need to do is open RStudio—even simpler!

  1. Open R Studio
  2. In the console, type windows() if using Windows, quartz() if using Mac OS X. (This tells R Commander to output all graphs to a new window). If you don’t do this, R Commander graphs will be output to the graphics window in RStudio.
  3. Go to the “Packages” tab, scroll down to “Rcmdr,” and check the box to load the plugin. (Alternatively, type library(Rcmdr) at the console.)